Last edited by Vudojar
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of Gender, work stress, and health found in the catalog.

Gender, work stress, and health

James Tyler Kent

Gender, work stress, and health

by James Tyler Kent

  • 378 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by American Psychological Assoc. in Washington, DC .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementedited by Debra L. Nelson and Ronald J. Burke.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 260 p. :
Number of Pages260
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22529640M
ISBN 101557989230

Dr. Nelson is the author of over research articles focusing on work stress, gender issues in the workplace, and leadership. Among her books are Stress and Challenge at the Top: The Paradox of the Successful Executive; Gender, Work Stress and Health; and Organizational Behavior: Science, the Real World, and by:   The book is essential for researchers, health practitioners, and policy analysts in the areas of sex-work research, HIV/AIDS, and LGBTQ/gender studies. This book explores the role of sex work in the lives of transgender women and the hazards that come with this type of work, revealing a complex interplay between sex and gender, survival and.

Experts explain the dangers of work-related stress and provide solutions. If you have a cruel boss or rotten co-workers, beware. It may not be just your job that's on the line. Clearly, a work.   American Psychological Association. Stress and Mind/Body Health. Report released Febru Matud, M. Pilar. Gender differences in stress and coping styles/ Personality and Individual Differences, Nov. , Vol. 37, Issue 7, pages National Institute of Mental Health. Women Hold Up Half the Sky: Women and Mental Health : Elaine Herscher.

  Mirgain is careful to note that it's not a matter of one gender being more or less affected by stress, and that every individual is different. But, both men and women experience stress and are affected by it equally. What can differ between the genders is not only how they react to it, but the situations that can trigger stress in the first place.   Research on stress and gender carried out in the author's laboratory over two decades is reviewed. Problems related to stress in women's and men's everyday life have been approached by combining concepts and methods from the behavioural, social and biomedical sciences, using neuroendocrine and cardiovascular measurements as indices of the pressures Cited by:


Share this book
You might also like
Emerson, and other essays

Emerson, and other essays

Golden jubilee, 1899-1949.

Golden jubilee, 1899-1949.

second book of Samuel

second book of Samuel

Commercial Typewriting

Commercial Typewriting

John Talleur; recent work.

John Talleur; recent work.

Social credit

Social credit

organization and running of the cataloguing department of Coventry City Libraries

organization and running of the cataloguing department of Coventry City Libraries

CAJs response to the Strategic Plan of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission.

CAJs response to the Strategic Plan of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission.

Bing Crosby

Bing Crosby

Tales of the anvil

Tales of the anvil

The olive and its products

The olive and its products

Chillers

Chillers

The perils and the security of our country

The perils and the security of our country

Gender, work stress, and health by James Tyler Kent Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gender differences, a subject of and health book since the dawn of time, are the focus of Gender, Work Stress, and Health, a book that examines how socially defined gender roles affect individuals' experience of stress and health at s Debra L.

Nelson and Ronald J. Burke bring together an interdisciplinary set of prolific writers and researchers to explore the interplay of Pages: In this chapter, I review the common stressors that women tend to face in the workplace, describe relevant stress appraisal techniques and coping mechanisms, and apply the preventive stress management framework to recommend actions for creating work environments that minimize undue pressure for working women and enhance organizational : Faye And health book.

Cocchiara. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xii, pages: illustrations ; 26 cm: Contents: A framework for examining gender, work stress, and health / Debra L. Nelson, Ronald J. Burke --Managerial stress: are women more at risk?/ Sandra L. Fielden, Cary L. Cooper --Men, masculinity, and health / Ronald J.

Burke --Women and corporate. While many of the studies used innovative approaches, none were able to clearly separate the effects of gender and/or sex on work exposures and health (see for example, Beauregard et al., Curtis et al., Geoffrion et al., Farioli et al.

and Padkapayeva et al. ()) Only one study used inclusive language in their exposure and health assessment Cited by: 7. 1. Introduction. Excess stress is the cause of considerable problems in developed countries.

Much of this stress has been linked to work and employment [], and the latter takes up a large part of our ing to the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work [], stress was the second most common work-related health problem inwhen it affected 22% of Cited by:   In Gender, Work Stress, and Health, editors Debra L.

Nelson and Ronald J. Burke explore how socially defined gender roles affect individuals' experience of stress and health at work. Working with a group of interdisciplinary contributors, they examine the interplay of gender, individual differences, social support, coping skills, family Price: $   Nevertheless, the research on gender differences in work stress and health suggests a variety of solutions: Social Support.

Read a non-work-related book, write in a journal, complete a. Sir Cary L. Cooper CBE is 50th Anniversary Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health at Manchester Business is the author or editor of more than books on occupational stress, women at work and industrial and organizational psychology, has written over scholarly articles for academic journals, and is a frequent media commentator.

Continued. When faced with stress, the body releases a number of different hormones, says Redford Williams, MD, director of the Behavioral Medicine Author: Daryn Eller.

This chapter discusses gender, burnout and work–related stress. Specifically it looks at the role gender plays with regard to work–life balance, pay, career advancement, stress, mental health and physical health.

Specific topics that OHP is attempting to address include work-related stress; occupational health disparities related to gender, age, ethnicity or race, work-family interface; increasing.

Stress and your health. Stress is a reaction to a change or a challenge. In the short term, stress can be helpful.

It makes you more alert and gives you energy to get things done. But long-term stress can lead to serious health problems. Women are more likely than men to report symptoms of stress, including headaches and upset stomach.

Stress has been proposed as an explanatory factor of gender differences in health, because gender seems to be relevant in each element of the stress-health process, from the appraisal or not of a given event as stressful up to coping, as well as in the relevance of responses to stress in health issues.

Despite this, there is no unanimity on Cited by: 2. A broader perspective in research on how gender mediates stress and health is needed, with an emphasis on the many levels (e.g., psychophysiological, social) at.

Our socio-cognitive perspective on gender inequity in health contributes to the current debate (see Doyal, ). Gender differences in health and stress have been described. Socialization, particularly through gender roles and gender traits, has been related to the stress process, the experience of stress, and to the health of by:   As discussed, stress can have devastating effects on wellbeing and quality of life, and have long-lasting affects on mental health.

While the coping mechanisms that both genders use are helpful to consider when navigating how to approach stress on a corporate level, it is critical to understand that stress impacts men and women : Rebecca Mckeand. Job Stress in a Changing Workforce presents critical research studies and thought on the ways job stresses can affect individual workers.

This book also examines the economic and demographic trends, focusing on the new demands posed by workforce diversity (e.g., gender, age, cultural, and ethnic factors affecting careers, stress harassment, and social identity) and Pages:   Health consequences of the gender segregated labour market have previously been demonstrated in the light of gender composition of occupations and workplaces, with somewhat mixed results.

Associations between the gender composition and health status have been suggested to be shaped by the psychosocial work environment. The present study aims Cited by: 6. Gender Roles and Coping with Stress. A major issue linking gender role stress and health has involved gender differences in coping with stress.

As we alluded to earlier, consistent with their gender roles, men are more likely to externalize and women internalize their stress (Huselid & Cooper, ). Therefore, masculine ideology.

The Handbook of Work Stress focuses primarily on identifying the different sources of work stress across different contexts and individuals. Part I focuses on work stressors that have been studied for decades (e.g., organizational-role stressors, work schedules) as well as stressors that have received less empirical and public scrutiny (e.g.

In this post, we consider the need to address work-related stress. Work stress. Work stress is a type of stress associated with the workplace that can be occasional or chronic, although most cases fall under the second type mentioned (Cavanaugh, Boswell, Roehling and. The influence of gender roles on coping with workplace stressors was examined among adult undergraduate students ( females, 46 males) who were concurrently employed while attending college.

The majority of participants (%) were White and from working-class backgrounds. As expected, androgynous persons were significantly more likely Cited by: Gender differences are the focus of this book which examines how socially defined gender roles affect individuals' experience of stress and health at work.

The editors bring together an interdisciplinary set of writers and researchers to explore the interplay of gender, individual differences, social support, coping skills, family dynamics and aspects of the work .